Winter Advisers’ Seminar 2021

Building a Culture of Credibility

Save the Date!

Our 2021 Winter Seminar will be Saturday, March 6, 2021

9:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

“To Tell the Truth: Building a Culture of Credibility”

at Brookfield Central High School, Brookfield, Wisconsin

(with virtual participation as an option)

Jeff Browne, our keynote speaker, will show us how to create a culture of credibility in the newsroom. Browne will cover how to use best practices in teaching journalistic research and requiring students to value truth above all else in the journalistic endeavor. He will lead you to think about what makes a good reporter, from research skills to ethical considerations. Finally, we will review best practices in a fact-checking endeavor and he will lead you through a simple fact-checking exercise that your students could replicate in the coming year. Oh, and he really likes whole wheat bread for his sandwiches.

 

SATURDAY, March 6, 2021 – Overview of Sessions

Jeff will host three main sessions in addition to two brief EdCamp style sessions and time for a luncheon to network and informally share ideas.

 

Building a Culture of Credibility

If the rest of the world treats truth as a commodity or as a weapon, how do we get student journalists to understand that it is the foundation of what they do? We will look at the lessons of the past few years to learn how we as journalism teachers can use Quill and Scroll’s eight principles to develop a newsroom that values ethical journalistic practice.

 

What Makes a Good Reporter?

How do you teach basic reporting skills in a newsroom that values credibility? What sort of checks do you have on individual reporters and editors? Do your students know how to evaluate sources for credibility? We will look at best practices from professional and college newsrooms to see what you can incorporate to make sure that every single journalist in your classroom — from editors to photographers, from designers to reporters — values truth above all else.

 

Establish a Sexy Fact-Checking Enterprise

Politifact, Factcheck.org, Snopes and other sites have established themselves as reliable and credible sources for checking statements made by public figures and politicians, both online and in person. But there’s still a whole lot of ground to be checked when it comes to the information high school students consume. We’ll look at how your students can establish a fact-checking enterprise at your school that is unique to your culture, checking on everything from social media memes to textbook entries to statement’s in your principal’s e-newsletter. Then we’ll take some time to do a sample fact-check on our own, one that mimics what your students could pursue.

 

Registration information coming this November!